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I Thoughts on Modern Literature

     IN our fidelity to the higher truth we need not  disown our debt, in our actual state of culture, in the twilights of experience, to these rude helpers. They keep alive the memory and the hope of a better day. When we flout all particular books as initial merely, we truly express the privilege…

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IV Agriculture of Massachusetts

       IN an afternoon in April, after a long walk, I  traversed an orchard where boys were grafting apple‑trees, and found the Farmer in his cornfield. He was holding the plough, and his son driving the oxen. This man always impresses me with respect, he is so manly, so sweet‑tempered, so faithful, so disdainful of…

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Poems I

IPOEMSGOOD-BYE GOOD-BYE, proud world! I’m going home:Thou art not my friend, and I’m not thine.Long through thy weary crowds I roam;A river-ark on the ocean brine,Long I’ve been tossed like the driven foam;But now, proud world! I’m going home. Good-bye to Flattery’s fawning face;To Grandeur with his wise grimace;To upstart Wealth’s averted eye;To supple Office,…

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Poems II May-Day and Other Pieces

IIMAY-DAY AND OTHER PIECES MAY-DAYDAUGHTER of Heaven and Earth, coy Spring,With sudden passion languishing,Teaching barren moors to smile,Painting pictures mile on mile,Holds a cup with cowslip-wreaths,Whence a smokeless incense breathes. The air is full of whistlings bland;What was that I heardOut of the hazy land?Harp of the wind, or song of bird, Or vagrant booming…

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Poems

I POEMS GOOD-BYE GOOD-BYE, proud world! I’m going home: Thou art not my friend, and I’m not thine. Long through thy weary crowds I roam; A river-ark on the ocean brine, Long I’ve been tossed like the driven foam; But now, proud world! I’m going home. Good-bye to Flattery’s fawning face; To Grandeur with his…